Walking Your Dog In The Heat

Remember that the surface the paws are walking on may be quite a bit hotter than cooler times of the year. Though it may not be felt through your shoes or sandals, there is direct contact between the ground surface and the dog's paws. Not all outdoor surfaces are uncomfortably hot for dogs, but you must take the lead and understand that they cannot verbally tell you that.

Please keep in mind that a dog's fur acts as a sun block. This helps to keep the skin healthy. Shaving a dog that is accustomed to a thicker coat may throw off the body temperature regulators and thought process ones, too. If your dog does not take much needed breaks from activity while in the sun (as usually done in the past), your dog can overdo it and risk heat-related illness! It has been said that fur insulates the dog from heat just as it protects from the cold. Do your research about giving your dog a shorter hair cut before doing so! With just a little exposure to direct sunlight, a dog's skin can burn quickly and badly.

Have walks with your dog be healthy and fun! By doing so, you will both enjoy the companionship and the exercise.

Dog and Cat Medicine

Should dogs and cats take human pain medications?
Absolutely not!

Why?
Serious harm and even death is a result of giving human medications to dogs and cats. Medicine must be developed with canine and feline needs in mind!

What should I do if my dog or cat is in pain?
See your vet at quickly as possible, because the sooner the dog or cat can be seen by a professional, the faster the issue can be (hopefully) brought under control. It must be determined what the underlying cause is and the most effective pain management solution.

It may be tempting to give pets human pain killers. DON'T DO IT!! Human pain killers can cause much, much worse suffering and can possibly kill!

Dogs and Rawhides

A rawhide is exactly what the word states: A raw, dried out animal hide.

In addition to rawhide bones and chews, this includes pig snouts, pig ears, cow ears, bull tails, lamb ears, choo-hooves, and others.

The vast majority of these rawhide treats for pets are made outside of the United States. However, even those made in the United States are a potential hazard.

Rawhide purchased as a treat for your pet is a hide which is usually bull, cow, or horse obtained from slaughter houses, scraped clean of all vestiges of fat, meat, and hair. However, it can be made from almost any animal. The flesh side may be scraped clean by hand, by use of a drawknife and/or scraper. Some places have machinery to do this. Another method is to soak the fleshed hide in Lime or Ash-Lye solution. Ash-Lye involves covering or soaking the hide.

Historically, rawhide has been used by Native Americans and Early Europeans for many things, including building material, boat construction, binding, repairing broken gunstocks and horse gear, etc. Rawhide doesn't easily break down as it is a very strong, durable item.

Please give this serious thought and be careful if you do let your dog have rawhides. There is always the fear of a dog swallowing a piece that may get lodged in the throat and cause choking.

Dog Sizes, Breeds, and Groups

Measured to the shoulder:

6" to 9"

6" to 9"

7" to 8"

8" to 10"

8" to 11"

8" to 11"

8" to 11"

8" to 11"

8" to 9"

8 1/2" to 11 1/2"

9" to 10"

9" to 10"

9" to 10"

9" to 11 1/2"

9" to 12"

9" to 13"

9 1/2" to 10"

9 1/2" to 11 1/2"

10" to 17 1/2"

10" to 11"

10" to 11"

10" to 11"

10" to 11"

10" to 12"

10" to 12"

10" to 12"

10" to 12"

10" to 12"

10" to 12"

10" to 12"

10" to 13"

10" to 14"

10 1/2" to 12 1/2"

10 1/2" to 12 1/2"

11" to 13"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 14"

12" to 15"

12" to 16"

12" to 16"

13" to 15"

13" to 15"

13" to 15"

13" to 16"

13 1/2" to 14 1/2"

13 1/2" to 16 1/2"

14" to 16"

14" to 16"

14" to 19"

14" to 19"

14 1/2" to 15 1/2"

14 1/2" to 15 1/2"

15" to 16"

15" to 16"

15" to 17"

15" to 17"

15" to 18"

15" to 19"

15" to 21"

15 1/2" to 16 1/2"

15 1/2" to 20"

16" to 17"

16" to 19"

16" to 19"

17" to 18"

17" to 19"

17" to 19"

17" to 19"

17" to 19"

17" to 19"

17" to 19"

17" to 20"

17" to 23"

17 1/2" to 19 1/2"

17 1/2" to 19 1/2"

17 1/2" to 20"

18" to 24"

18" to 20"

18" to 20"

18" to 20"

18" to 20 1/2"

18" to 20 1/2"

18" to 21"

18" to 21"

18" to 23"

19" to 21"

19" to 21"

19" to 23 1/2"

19" to 24"

19 1/2" to 22"

20" to 22"

20" to 23 1/2"

20" to 24"

20" to 24"

20" to 26"

21" to 22"

21" to 24"

21" to 24"

21" to 25"

21" to 25"

21" to 25"

21" to 25"

21" to 25"

21" to 25"

21" to 25"

21" to 26"

21" to 27"

22" to 24"

22" to 24"

22" to 24"

22" to 25"

22" to 26"

22" to 26"

22" to 26"

22" to 26"

22" to 26"

22" to 26"

22" to 27"

22" to 28"

22" to 28"

22 1/2" to 24 1/2"

22 1/2" to 27 1/2"

22 1/2" to 27 1/2"

23" to 28"

23" to 25"

23" to 25"

23" to 26"

23" to 26"

23" to 27"

23" to 27"

23" to 27"

23" to 27"

23" to 27"

23" to 27"

23" to 27"

23" to 28"

23" to 28"

23" to 28"

23 1/2" to 27 1/2"

23 1/2" to 28 1/2"

23 1/2" to 29 1/2"

23" to 27 1/2"

24" to 26"

24" to 26"

24" to 27"

24" to 27"

24" to 27"

24" to 27"

24" to 27"

24" to 28"

24" to 29"

24" to 29"

24 1/2" to 27"

25" to 27"

25" to 27"

25" to 27"

25" to 30"

25" to 32"

25 1/2" to 28 1/2"

25 1/2" to 27 1/2"

25 1/2" to 27 1/2"

26" to 28"

26" to 28"

26" to 29"

27" to 29"

27" to 30"

27 1/2" to 30"

28" to 32"

28" to 32"

28" to 32"

30" to 35"

Chihuahua

Pekingese

Brussels Griffon

Toy Fox Terrier

Dachshund

Papillon

Pomeranian

Shih Tzu

Yorkshire Terrier

Havanese

Maltese

Norfolk Terrier

Silky Terrier

Affenpinscher

Tibetan Spaniel

Chinese Crested

Cairn Terrier

Bichon Frise

Alaskan Klee Kai

Australian Terrier

Border Terrier

Lhasa Apso

West Highland White Terrier

English Toy Spaniel

Manchester Terrier

Miniature Pinscher

Norwich Terrier

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pug

Scottish Terrier

Schipperke

Miniature Bull Terrier

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Sealyham Terrier

French Bulldog

Basset Hound

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Glen of Imaal Terrier

Jack Russell Terrier

Lowchen

Miniature Schnauzer

Parson Russell Terrier

Patterdale Terrier

Bulldog

Japanese Spitz

Rat Terrier

Beagle

Italian Greyhound

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Shetland Sheepdog

Lakeland Terrier

Shiba Inu

American Cocker Spaniel

Tibetan Terrier

New Guinea Singing Dog

Puli

Smooth Fox Terrier

Wire Fox Terrier

Manchester Terrier (Standard)

Sussex Spaniel

Boston Terrier

English Cocker Spaniel

American Water Spaniel

American Eskimo Dog

Poodle

Bedlington Terrier

Finnish Spitz

Basenji

German Pinscher

Keeshond

Field Spaniel

American Staffordshire Terrier

Polish Lowland Sheepdog

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Welsh Springer Spaniel

Welsh Terrier

Australian Cattle Dog

Portuguese Water Dog

Kerry Blue Terrier

Schnauzer (Standard)

Whippet

Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Chinese Shar-pei

Chow Chow

Irish Terrier

Brittany

Shikoku

Border Collie

English Springer Spaniel

Australian Shepherd

Clumber Spaniel

Harrier

Samoyed

Canaan

Norwegian Elkhound

Bearded Collie

Siberian Husky

Plott

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog

Bull Terrier

Irish Water Spaniel

Vizsla

Boxer

Canary Dog

German Shorthaired Pointer

Golden Retriever

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Pharaoh Hound

Skye Terrier

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Redbone Coonhound

Dalmatian

Flat-Coated Retriever

Old English Sheepdog

American Foxhound

Belgian Malinois

Belgian Sheepdog

Belgian Tervuren

Collie

German Wirehaired Pointer

Thai Ridgeback

Rottweiler

Beauceron

Tibetan Mastiff

Labrador Retriever

Ibizan Hound

Spinone Italiano

Saluki

Airedale Terrier

Alaskan Malamute

Alaskan Husky

Pointer

Australian Kelpie Sheep Dog

Black and Tan Coonhound

Bouvier des Flandres

Briard

French Mastiff

English Foxhound

Weimaraner

Akita

Boerboel

Hovawart

Giant Schnauzer

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

Neapolitan Mastiff

Bernese Mountain Dog

German Shepherd

Gordon Setter

Bloodhound

Bullmastiff

English Setter

Otterhound

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Doberman Pinscher

Bandog

Chinese Foo Dog

Tosa Inu

Afghan Hound

Curly-Coated Retriever

Irish Setter

Saint Bernard

Great Pyrenees

Maremma

Komondor

Kuvasz

Borzoi

Newfoundland

Black Russian Terrier

Anatolian Shepherd

Greyhound

Mastiff

Great Dane

Leonberger

Scottish Deerhound

Irish Wolfhound

Toy

Toy

Toy

Toy

Hound

Toy

Toy

Toy

Toy

Toy

Toy

Terrier

Toy

Toy

Non-sporting

Toy

Terrier

Non-sporting

Rare & other

Terrier

Terrier

Non-sporting

Terrier

Toy

Toy

Toy

Terrier

Herding

Toy

Terrier

Non-sporting

Terrier

Herding

Terrier

Non-sporting

Hound

Toy

Miscellaneous

Terrier

Non-sporting

Terrier

Terrier

Rare & other

Non-sporting

Rare & other

Rare & other

Hound

Toy

Hound

Herding

Terrier

Non-sporting

Sporting

Non-sporting

Rare & other

Herding

Terrier

Terrier

Terrier

Sporting

Non-sporting

Sporting

Sporting

Non-sporting

Non-sporting

Terrier

Non-sporting

Hound

Working

Non-sporting

Sporting

Terrier

Herding

Terrier

Terrier

Sporting

Terrier

Herding

Working

Terrier

Working

Hound

Terrier

Non-sporting

Non-sporting

Terrier

Sporting

Rare & other

Herding

Sporting

Herding

Sporting

Hound

Working

Herding

Hound

Herding

Working

Miscellaneous

Sporting

Rare & other

Terrier

Sporting

Sporting

Working

Rare & other

Sporting

Sporting

Sporting

Hound

Terrier

Sporting

Miscellaneous

Non-sporting

Sporting

Herding

Hound

Herding

Herding

Herding

Herding

Sporting

Rare & other

Working

Miscellaneous

Rare & other

Sporting

Hound

Sporting

Hound

Terrier

Working

Rare & other

Sporting

Rare & other

Hound

Herding

Herding

Rare & other

Hound

Sporting

Working

Rare & other

Rare & other

Working

Working

Miscellaneous

Working

Herding

Sporting

Hound

Working

Sporting

Hound

Hound

Working

Rare & other

Rare & other

Rare & other

Hound

Sporting

Sporting

Working

Working

Rare & other

Working

Working

Hound

Working

Miscellaneous

Working

Hound

Working

Working

Rare & other

Hound

Hound

Dogs and Overheating

It is very important for a dog's health and well-being to not overheat. Please do not leave your dog in a hot car while running errands, etc. Even just a few moments in a hot car can cause serious complications, including heat stroke! Extreme conditions can prove fatal!

Here are some warning signs of a dog overheating:

  • collapse
  • excessive panting
  • difficulty breathing
  • salivation
  • depression
  • stupor(acting intoxicated)
  • seizure
  • coma

Precautions to avoid heat-related symptoms are similar to humans: Drink plenty of water and stay cool. If a dog shows signs as listed above, immediately take action!

Get the dog away from the heat source.
Place cool, water-saturated towels on the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and feet.
Turn a fan on and point it at the dog.
Immediately take dog to the closest veterinarian.

There are also other actions that can help:

Spray dog with cool (NOT COLD, AS THIS MAY CAUSE DOG TO GO INTO SHOCK!) water from hose (make sure the hose is not hot if it has been in direct sunlight). Put a small amount of alcohol on the dog's paw pads (this evaporates and cools the dog)

If you consider using instant-cold packs, NEVER apply directly to the dog as getting too cold too fast can cause shock if the dog is suffering from a heat-related illness. ALWAYS place a damp towel between the ice pack and the dog.

To help keep your dog cool during the summer, consider ice cubes. Some dogs like to chew on ice, which helps to keep them cool and happy during hot weather months.

A dog that has previously suffered heat stroke is more susceptible to it in the future.

More particularly sensitive to problems in hot weather are brachycephalic dogs (dogs with shorter snouts) such as Shih Tzus, Pekinese, Bull Dogs, Boston Terriers, and Lhasa Apsos.

Walking Your Dog In The Cold

Pets face serious danger while overcoming the characteristics of cold weather when out walking.
Tips to help:

Prevent dog from straying onto frozen water
-If any part of a dog goes through ice, the combination of shock and extremely cold water will quickly bring on hypothermia (body loses heat faster than can replace it). Please remember that when cold water saturates the dog's fur and chills the skin, the body temperature falls quickly
-A fall on hard ice can cause injury or multiple injuries.

Keep your dog warm
-Dogs with short hair or those that get cold easily should wear coats or sweaters. More than one layer may be required! Wool or thin fleece should be the first layer and outer layers may be thicker to provide more protection.

Exercise is important all-year round. With knowledge and caution, both you and your dog can enjoy those precious and memorable times outside.

Dogs and Chocolate

It takes, on average, a fairly large amount of theobromine (100-150 mg/kg) to cause a toxic reaction.

There are variables to consider, such as animal size, chocolate concentration, and individual sensitivity.

On average, milk chocolate contains 44mg. of theobromine per ounce, semi-sweet chocolate contains 150 mg. per ounce, and baker's chocolate contains 390 mg. per ounce.

2 ounces of baker's chocolate can cause great risk to a 15 lb. dog. But 2 ounces of milk chocolate will only cause digestive problems.

Xanthines affect peripheral nerves, the cardiovascular system, and nervous system. It also has a diuretic effect.

Clinical signs include:

Vomiting
Increased heart rate
Increased urinaton
Hyper excitability
Restlessness
Hyper irritability
Diarrhea
Muscle tremors

There is no specific antidote for this type of poisoning. The half life of the toxin is 17 1/2 hours in dogs. Administering activated charcoal may inhibit the absorption of the toxin. An anticonvulsant may be indicated if neurological signs are present and need to be controlled. To protect the heart, oxygen therapy, intravenous medications, and fluids may be needed.

Milk chocolate will often cause diarrhea 12 to 24 hours after being ingested. To prevent dehydration, this should be treated symptomatically (fluids, etc.).

If you think that your dog has ingested chocolate, contact your veterinarian immediately to help determine the proper treatment.

Dogs and Fireworks

Pet Lodge USA - Dog Juggling BallsA fairly common phobia for dogs is a fear of fireworks. They often find frightening the unpredictable loud noise and bright displays of light.

To help your dog through festivities, here are a few helpful hints that may you may consider:

1) Desensitize your dog. Buy a recording, or better yet, a video of fireworks being displayed. Play at a very low volume and give your dog a treat, play tug-of-war, or do some cuddling during the time the audio or video is on. Over the course of several days, slightly raise the volume each day. If your dog shows signs of being afraid, turn the volume down to where he doesn't show fear. If you do this in increments each day, you may help your dog overcome the sound and perhaps even the sight of fireworks.

2) Exhibit no change in behavior. When dogs show signs of fear, some people feel they need to baby them by talking in soft voices, cuddling, or petting them more than they usually do. If you react to fireworks by jumping or shouting, you may worsen his fear. A dog can tell from his owner's body language if there is a need to be afraid.

3) Turn up the radio or tv. If you turn the volume up of a show where people are talking or of one with soft music, you can take away the unpredictable sounds of fireworks.

4) Turn on a fan or air conditioner. If your dog isn't afraid of a fan or air conditioner, this may aid you in the situation so that the fireworks will be much lower in noise level.

5) Take your dog to a more insulated room. Maybe there is a place where you can take your dog in close proximity where the sounds of the fireworks will be much lower in noise level.

6) Allow your dog to go to his special comfort zone. If your dog has a hiding place where he feels secure, you may want to let him go there. Don't force him to listen to the sounds of the fireworks if he doesn't like them. That could cause an increase in his fear of fireworks, and he could respond with aggressiveness.

If your dog's fear is severe, nothing short of an anti-anxiety medication or sedative may help. Talk to your veterinarian about it.

Dog Harness Instructions

Having a dog walk with a harness helps your control while in motion and prevents injury to your pet's neck and spine.Pet Lodge USA - Winking Dog

How to put on your dog harness in seven easy steps:

Step One: Hold the harness in front of you. Notice it is made of four pieces of material: two circles and two straight pieces holding it together. Snap the buckle so that it is closed.

Step Two: Lay the harness on your lap. With your hands, position it so the closed circle is closest to your knees and the circle with the buckle is closest to your stomach, with the shiny metal ring being on top.

Step Three: Position the dog with the head away from you. If the dog is trying to move while harnessing, apply slight pressure to keep in place.

Step Four: Make sure the harness is in the same position as the way you laid it on your lap. Place the closed circle over the dog's head moving the metal ring to the dog's middle back.

Step Five: Lift up the dog's right leg and move it through the larger hole. This will make a t-bone of material down the dog's back with the metal ring still at the center of the back.

Step Six: Reach under the dog's left leg. Pull both sides of the buckle together and snap to the rear of the left leg. Both the dog's underbelly and back should have pieces of material in the shape of a capitol I or H, depending on the angle.

Step Seven: Attach the leash to the metal ring on the dog's back.

Now your dog is ready for a walk with you!